Italian Travels – Two – Lucca

The town of Lucca is thought to be the most charming of the “art cities” of Tuscany, Italy. It is small enough to stroll around and although we only spent a few hours there, we got a taste of what it had to offer. It is known for its churches, a beautiful garden (Villa Reale di Marlia, which was closed when we were there) and as the home of the composer Puccini. A fun fact is that it is also Europe’s leading producer of toilet paper and tissues.

Here are some of the sights we saw. The old Roman wall remains intact around the city. This is the entrance

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It was hot and we were hungry and thirsty so headed for a table at one of the many small cafes.

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At the table next to us was a couple with a baby in her stroller and her three-year-old sister. Perfectly good little ones. Suddenly we heard a crash. My first thought was that a chandelier had fallen, but from where? No chandeliers outside in the square. One of the little ones had managed to pull the tablecloth off the table and broke plates, glasses and bottles. A few tears of fright but no one hurt and in no time everything was picked up. We continued to enjoy our pasta con fungi and mozzarella and tomato salad. When we left the father apologized for his children, but we assured him it was fine and we were grateful no one was hurt. I could not resist making this chicken that hung next to the tables, squawk.

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We strolled around town and joined others gazing at the buildings and the blooms.

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and came upon my favorite of all shops.

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They were doing renovations on the building in the square, hence the signs. I loved the stripes on the posters, reflections from somewhere. Happily I pottered around the stalls, pulling English books from the piles. I did not buy anything but add this Square of the Book to my list of bookstores around the world.

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We were so hot that we had to follow this little girl’s example. Not to ride bikes but to do what everyone does in Italy in the summer eat Gelato.

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Lucca is full of churches and they are seen around every corner and through every alley.DSC03142DSC03140Strolling down the street, finishing our gelato we saw this sign. It looked like a typical New England general store, and it was air conditioned so we took refuge. Of course I bought a few things too.

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Too tired and hot to continue to explore we went back to the Piazza. I found that there are very few benches in Italy so I joined many other tired people on the steps of Casa di Puccini – the home of the composer. In front of me was the beautiful cathedral of Lucca.  The Duomo of San Martino,  dates back to the 6 C, and was rebuilt in Romanesque style in the 11 C, consecrated by Alexander II (1070), and again restored in the quattrocento, when the beautiful columns of the upper arches were added. We just sat there and took pictures while the crowds wandered in front of and around us.

Notice the angel in the picture below

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and here is the angel facing the other way.

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The clouds were flecks of white against the blue so I simply pointed my camera up to the sky and shot.

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We had a lovely time in Lucca. We walked out of the walled city, down this avenue of ancient trees to our bus. We will return one day.

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Pictures and text, copywrited by EveryjourneyTraveled

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One Response to Italian Travels – Two – Lucca

  1. Jane Sternberg says:

    I loved your article and pictures of Lucca. It brought back memories of my trip there several years ago and I hope to return one day soon.

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